PARIS

The Louvre or the Louvre Museum, is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward). Approximately 38,000 objects from prehistory to the 21st century are exhibited over an area of 72,735 square metres (782,910 square feet). In 2017, the Louvre was the world's most visited art museum, receiving 8.1 million visitors. The Musée du Louvre contains more than 380,000 objects and displays 35,000 works of art in eight curatorial departments.

(Via: Louvre)

Closed: Tuesdays

Admission

General | €15,00

Under 18 | Free

Art Teachers | Free

The Musée d'Orsay, is a museum in Paris, France, on the Left Bank of the Seine. It is housed in the former Gare d'Orsay, a Beaux-Arts railway station built between 1898 and 1900. The museum holds mainly French art dating from 1848 to 1914, including paintings, sculptures, furniture, and photography. It houses the largest collection of impressionist and post- Impressionist masterpieces in the world, by painters including Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Sisley, Gauguin, and Van Gogh. Many of these works were held at the Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume prior to the museum's opening in 1986. It is one of the largest art museums in Europe. The museum building was originally a railway station, Gare d'Orsay, constructed for the Chemin de Fer de Paris à Orléans and finished in time for the 1900 Exposition Universelle to the design of three architects: Lucien Magne, Émile Bénard and Victor Laloux. It was the terminus for the railways of southwestern France until 1939. (Via: MUSEE)

Closed: Mondays

Admission

General | €12,00

The Musée de l'Orangerie is an art gallery of impressionist and post-impressionist paintings located in the west corner of the Tuileries Gardens next to the Place de la Concorde in Paris. Though most famous for being the permanent home for eight Water Lilies murals by Claude Monet, the museum also contains works by Paul Cézanne, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Rousseau, Alfred Sisley, Chaim Soutine, and Maurice Utrillo, among others. (Via: L'Orangerie)

Closed: Tuesdays

Admission

Full Rate | €9,00
Concessions | €6,50

Under 18 | Free

The impeccable Fondation Louis Vuitton is an art museum and cultural center sponsored by the group LVMH and its subsidiaries. The $143 million museum located in Paris was opened in October 2014. The building was designed by the architect Frank Gehry, and is adjacent to the Jardin d'Acclimatation in the Bois de Boulogne of the 16th arrondissement of Paris. The collection comprises a constantly evolving body of works that naturally falls into four categories: Contemplative, Pop, Expressionist, Music & Sound. Conceived with a long-term vision of engagement with a wide public, the collection is essentially made up of artworks that date from the 1960s to the current day. It is structured around the stated aims of its founder, Bernard Arnault.  (Via: LV Foundation)

Closed: Tuesdays

Admission

Tickets Must Be Purchased Online

Containing over 60,000 works, the collections of the Palace of Versailles span a very broad period. The collections reflect the dual identity of the Palace, as both a palace occupied by the kings of France and the royal court, and later a museum “dedicated to the glories of France,” inaugurated by Louis-Philippe in 1837. The collections of the museum founded by Louis-Philippe, and still active today, offer a chronological overview of the history of France from the Middle Ages up to the late 19th century. The museum was intended to provide both historical and iconographic insight into the great figures and events which shaped the history of France, and the collections primarily comprise sculptures and paintings dating from the 16th through to the 19th centuries. They include originals and copies, specially-commissioned pieces, and regular purchases. (Via: Versailles)

Closed: Mondays

Admission

One-Day Passport | €20,00 

Two-Day Passport | €25,00

Under 18 | Free

The Musée Rodin in Paris, France, is a museum that was opened in 1919, dedicated to the works of the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. It has two sites: the Hôtel Biron and surrounding grounds in central Paris and just outside Paris at Rodin's old home, the Villa des Brillants at Meudon (Hauts-de-Seine). The collection includes 6,600 sculptures, 8,000 drawings, 8,000 old photographs, and 7,000 objets d’art. The museum receives 700,000 visitors annually. While living in the Villa des Brillants, Rodin used the Hôtel Biron as his workshop from 1908 and subsequently donated his entire collection of sculptures (along with paintings by Vincent van Gogh, Claude Monet, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir that he had acquired) to the French State on the condition that they turn the buildings into a museum dedicated to his works. (Via: Rodin)

Closed: Mondays

Admission

General | €10,00

Under 18 | Free

EU Residents (18-25) | Free

The Musée Picasso Paris collection comprises over 5,000 works and tens of thousands of archived pieces. For its quality and scope as well as the range of art forms it encompasses, this collection is the only one in the world to present both Picasso’s complete painted, sculpted, engraved and illustrated œuvre and a precise record—through sketches, studies, drafts, notebooks, etchings in various stages, photographs, illustrated books, films and documents—of the artist’s creative process. (Via: Picasso)

Closed: Mondays

Admission

General | €12,50

The museum features a collection of over three hundred Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works by Claude Monet (with the largest collection of his works in the world), Berthe Morisot, Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro, Paul Gauguin, Paul Signac and Pierre-Auguste Renoir. In addition it houses the Wildenstein Collection of illuminated manuscripts and the Jules and Paul Marmottan collection of Napoleonic era art and furniture as well as Italian and Flemish primitive paintings. (Via: Monet)

Closed: Mondays

Admission

General | €11,00

Under 18 | €7,50

Students | €7,50

Teachers | €7,50

Opened in 1961, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (or MaM) is situated in the east wing of the Palais de Tokyo, a monumental building with sober decor, just a short walk from the Eiffel Tower. The museum is devoted to contemporary art in all its forms: paintings, sculptures, installations, photographs and video. The museum's permanent collections, with more than 8,000 works of art, show the diverse art trends of the 20th century: cubism, Ecole de Paris, abstract art, new realism, etc. The museum houses works by Pablo Picasso, Juan Gris, Henri Matisse, Alberto Giacometti, Georges Braque and Yves Klein. In parallel to these permanent collections, large temporary exhibitions are organized. A cafeteria and bookshop are some of the additional services offered by the museum. (Via: MaM)

Closed: Mondays

Admission

Free

The Guimet Museum is an art museum located at 6, place d'Iéna in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, France. It has one of the largest collections abroad of Asian art. Founded by Émile Étienne Guimet, an industrialist, the museum first opened at Lyon in 1879 but was later transferred to Paris, opening in the place d'Iéna in 1889. Devoted to travel, Guimet was in 1876 commissioned by the minister of public instruction to study the religions of the Far East, and the museum contains many of the fruits of this expedition, including a fine collection of Chinese and Japanese porcelain and many objects relating not merely to the religions of the East but also to those of ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. One of its wings, the Panthéon Bouddhique, displays religious artworks. Some of the museum's artifacts were collected from Southeast Asia by French authorities during the colonial period. 

Closed: Tuesdays

Admission

General l €11,50

Any ticket purchase includes a second free visit within 14 days of ticket purchase.

The Petit Palais houses a significant collection of decorative murals and sculptures created between 1903 and 1925. The architect Charles Girault wanted to lend his building the grandeur and dignity of an official palace and created a programme of work designed to glorify the City of Paris and to celebrate the benefits of art. The locations for the areas to be decorated were carefully chosen with this aim in mind. They are mainly in areas through which people need to pass – entrance lobbies, the garden peristyle and the staircase under the cupola. Only the two large exhibition galleries also have decorative murals. This decoration took over twenty years to complete. (Via: PETIT)

Closed: Mondays

Admission

Permanent Collection | Free 

Temporary Exhibiton | Prices Vary

(View Prices)

The museum, installed in the painter’s family home, was a project conceived by Gustave Moreau (1826-1898). The apartments on the first floor form a small sentimental museum displaying family portraits and works given to Moreau by his friends Théodore Chassériau and Edgar Degas. The second and third floors are taken up with huge studios, containing hundreds of paintings and watercolours. The walls are covered with over four thousand drawings that give a broad perspective of the techniques and subjects of the undisputed master of French Symbolism. A unique house-studio in Paris, the Musée National Gustave Moreau has managed to retain all the magic of its original atmosphere. It is located in the heart of Nouvelle Athènes, in the 9th arrondissement at the foot of Montmartre. (Via: Moreau)

Closed: Tuesdays

Admission

Full rate | €5,00
Concessions | €3,00

Under 18 | Free

Members | Free

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